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Ecological Restoration Editorial Board

Representing a wide variety of disciplines within the restoration ecology world, Board members contribute their skills to editorial judgements and to identifying interesting projects that we may feature in future issues. We thank them for their contributions to this journal and improvements to our environment.

 

 

Scott Abella

Steven I. Apfelbaum

James Aronson

Paulette Bierzychudek

Peter Bowler

Lindsay Campbell

Robin L. Chazdon

Francisco A. Comín Sebastián

David Drake

Erin Espeland

Bram Gunther

Jason Hall

Emily Huff

Francine Hughes

Basil Iannone

Michelle Johnson

Holly Jones

Kristen Kaczynski

Kristen King

Márcia C. M. Marques

Jill McGrady

David Moreno-Mateos

Andrew Rayburn

Carrie Reinhardt Adams

David J. Robertson

Ted Shear

Greg Spyreas

Katharine Suding

Alan Unwin

Dennis Whigham

Ken Yocom

Kathryn Yurkonis

Luis Zambrano González

 



 

Scott Abella

Scott Abella is an Assistant Professor in Restoration Ecology with the School of Life Sciences at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, and Owner of Natural Resource Conservation LLC, an international company dedicated to applied conservation science and ecological restoration. Scott regularly works with diverse stakeholders, ranging from non-profits and federal agencies to private companies, to develop conservation actions, assess their effectiveness, and involve students and the public in restoration projects. Scott has worked in a variety of ecosystems including eastern forests, Midwestern oak savannas and prairies, western forests, and arid lands in the U.S. and internationally. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers, including eight with graduate students, and authored the 2015 book titled Conserving America's National Parks.

 

 

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Steven I. Apfelbaum

Steve Apfelbaum is a senior ecologist with Applied Ecological Services who has worked throughout the world on thousands of innovative ecological research and restoration projects for more than 35 years. Steve has contributed to many peer reviewed articles and technical studies. His contributions to books include Soil Carbon Management: Environmental, Economic and Societal Benefits (CRC press, 2007); the award winning Nature’s Second Chance (Beacon Press, 2010), and the Island Press series, Restoring Ecological Health to Your Land (2010) which provides a process and the tools for restoring aquatic, wetland, riverine and terrestrial ecological systems, including disturbed lands.
Website: www.appliedeco.com

 

 

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James Aronson

James Aronson, PhD, is a restoration ecologist at the Centre for Evolutionary and Functional Ecology Lab of the CNRS, in Montpellier, France and the Missouri Botanical Garden, a Representative-at-Large of the Society for Ecological Restoration (www.ser.org) and co-founder of the Restoring Natural Capital Alliance (www.rncalliance.org). He is editor-in-chief of the SER-Island Press book series, The Science and Practice of Ecological Restoration, and has authored, co-authored or published many books and articles on ecological restoration and related subjects. He participates and consults on restoration projects, programs and networks in desert and dryland, Mediterranean climate regions, tropical forest biomes, and other regions.

 

 

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Paulette Bierzychudek

Paulette Bierzychudek is Professor of Biology at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. She holds B.A. degrees from the University of Washington in both botany and zoology and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University. Her research interests include plant population biology, plant-insect interactions, and habitat restoration. She has worked with the Nature Conservancy on the restoration of grasslands for endangered butterfly recovery, and currently studies the ecology of urban forests. Paulette teaches undergraduate courses in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology and works to broaden access to science to women and minorities.

 

 

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Peter Bowler

Peter Bowler, PhD, is the Director of the University of California Natural Reserve System’s San Joaquin Marsh and Burns Pinyon Ridge Reserves, Director of the UCI Arboretum and Herbarium, Director of the UCI Minor in Global Sustainability, and is a faculty member in UCI’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. His research interests include restoration ecology, conservation biology, and freshwater biology. He has conducted wetland and upland restoration at the San Joaquin Marsh for over twenty years, and he teaches classes in Restoration Ecology, Field Freshwater Ecology, Mediterranean Ecosystems, Limnology and Freshwater Biology, Horticulture, Environmental Ethics, and Sustainable Landscaping at UCI.
Website: www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=2119

 

 

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Lindsay Campbell

Lindsay K. Campbell, PhD, is a research social scientist with the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, based at the New York City Urban Field Station (www.nrs.fs.fed.us/nyc). Her current research explores the dynamics of urban politics, environmental governance, natural resource stewardship, and sustainability policymaking. She is co-lead of the Stewardship Mapping and Assessment Project (STEW-MAP), which maps the social networks and spatial turf of civic, government, and private actors engaged in environmental stewardship in cities. Dr. Campbell holds a BA in Public Policy from Princeton University, a Masters in City Planning from MIT, and a PhD in Geography from Rutgers University.
Website: www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/lindsaycampbell

 

 

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Robin L. Chazdon

Robin L. Chazdon, PhD, is a leading authority on tropical forest regeneration and the conservation of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. She is a professor at the University of Connecticut, where her research has produced over 120 peer-reviewed scientific articles and three books. She currently leads a multi-investigator effort to understand the long-term dynamics of regenerating forests in the Neotropics. She has served as Editor-in-Chief of Biotropica and President of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC). She is currently the ATBC’s Executive Director. Dr. Chazdon is the principal investigator for the PARTNERS Research Coordination Network (People And Reforestation in the Tropics: A Network for Education, Research, and Synthesis).

 

 

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Francisco A. Comín Sebastián

Francisco A. Comín Sebastián, PhD, is a Research Professor at Pyrenean Institute of Ecology-CSIC, Spain. Formerly (1983–2002) Professor of Ecology and Limnology at University of Barcelona (Spain) and Invited Professor (1997–2005) at CINVESTAV-IPN (Mérida, Yucatán, México). Dr. Comín combines research on theoretical aspects with practical projects of restoration of wetlands and watersheds. He is interested on integrating the practice and benefits of ecological restoration into the socio-economic development, particularly in rural areas but also at global scale. He was member of the Board of Directors of SER (2005–2011) and active in different regions of the world (Europe, N.Africa, USA and México and Latin American countries).
Website: www.ipe.csic.es/comin-sebastian-francisco

 

 

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David Drake

David Drake is a Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research and extension programs primarily focus on wildlife and wildlife damage management in human-dominated landscapes. David also teaches an undergraduate course on wildlife damage management. David received his Ph.D in Forestry from North Carolina State University, a M.S. degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences from Texas A&M University, and a B.A degree in Biology from Macalester College.

 

 

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Erin Espeland

Erin K. Espeland, PhD, is a Research Ecologist with the USDA-ARS Pest Management Research Unit, Sidney MT USA. Her research focuses on establishment, genetic identity, and evolutionary potential of restored native populations in the face of biological invasions. This research includes the roles of competition and facilitation on restoration success and the contributions of genetic identity, diversity, and maternal effects on the establishment of restoration materials. She has recently expanded her research program to track whole-ecosystem recovery after weed removal and restoration; this includes bird, insect, and plant populations as well as soil conditions.

 

 

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Bram Gunther

Bram Gunther is the Co-Director of the Urban Field Station (a partnership with the US Forest Service), which is the science and communication hub of Forestry, Horticulture, and Natural Resources of the New York City Parks Department. He was previously Chief of Forestry, Horticulture, and Natural Resources. He is also the Co-Founder and Senior Advisor of the Natural Areas Conservancy, a public/private partnership established to unify the City's efforts to conserve, restore, and protect tens our thousands of acres of municipal forests, wetlands, and grasslands. He joined the New York City Parks Department in 1991 as an Urban Park Ranger. Three years later, he became the Citywide Director of the Rangers. He transferred to Central Forestry in 2000 and first as Deputy Chief and then Chief oversaw the growth of the division. He has many publications on land management and conservation. He has a bachelor’s degree in American literature from State University of New York at Purchase and a master’s degree in environmental management from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

 

 

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Jason Hall

Jason Hall is a Senior Scientist with Cramer Fish Sciences and has over 16 years of experience in fisheries research, restoration effectiveness monitoring, and status and trends monitoring. He has worked on numerous projects focused on salmonid ecology, life history diversity, habitat restoration, and habitat use during riverine, estuarine, and marine life stages. He has worked in a wide variety of aquatic and riparian habitats, from headwater streams to the nearshore environment. Jason also has extensive experience using geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies to address system-scale and large-scale habitat status, trends, and restoration effectiveness questions.
Website: https://www.fishsciences.net/jason-hall-m-s-c/

 

 

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Emily Huff

Emily S. Huff is an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University in the Department of Forestry. She teaches human dimensions of forestry and researches coupled human and natural systems pertaining to natural resource management. Her research spans urban and rural settings, and she uses many methods including qualitative inquiry and both predictive and computational modeling. Emily holds an MS in Natural Resources Science and Management from the University of Minnesota and a PhD in Forestry from the University of Maine. Prior to working at Michigan State University, Emily was a Research Forester at the USDA Forest Service, working on the National Woodland Owner Survey as part of the Northern Research Station.
Website: https://hufflab.weebly.com

 

 

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Francine Hughes

Francine M. R. Hughes, PhD, is an emeritus wetland scientist based at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. She specializes in research on the restoration of dynamic floodplain systems and their vegetation. She has jointly coordinated a series of EU-funded collaborative projects on this topic and is currently a member of an international advisory group, advising on the long-term monitoring and evaluation strategy for the Swiss national river restoration programme. Closer to home she has been involved for the last twenty years in the development of landscape-scale wetland creation projects in the Fenlands of Cambridgeshire, specializing in approaches to monitoring long-term trajectories of change in ecosystems and ecosystem services. She earned her BA and PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK and her MSc from the University of Calgary, Canada.
Website: https://www.anglia.ac.uk/science-and-technology/about/life-sciences/our-staff/francine-hughes

 

 

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Basil Iannone

Basil Iannone is an Assistant Professor and Extension Specialists in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation at the University of Florida, and is a member of an interdisciplinary faculty cohort focusing on sustainable and resilient land use. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Minnesota and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago where he studied wetland and woodland restoration, and the ecology, management, and belowground effects of invasive plants. As a postdoc at Purdue University, he studied macroscale patterns and drivers of forest plant invasions. His work currently emphasizes the ecology of residential landscapes and the restoration of ecological functionality in and around this expanding land use type.
Website: https://sfrc.ufl.edu/people/faculty/iannone_basil

 

 

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Michelle Johnson

Michelle Johnson is a Research Ecologist with the USDA Forest Service at the NYC Urban Field Station (http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/nyc/). Her research areas at the NYC Urban Field Station broadly include urban natural resources stewardship and urban tree health, with a current focus on environmental outcomes of stewardship, social-ecological frameworks, and spatial analyses of environmental stewardship organizations' activities. Her toolkit includes spatial analysis, qualitative and quantitative social science, and field ecology methods. Dr. Johnson holds a B.S. in Biology from Eckerd College, a M.S. in Natural Resource Planning from the University of Vermont, and a PhD in Ecology and Environmental Sciences from the University of Maine.
Website: https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/michelleljohnson

 

 

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Holly Jones

Holly Jones, PhD, is an ecosystem/restoration ecologist who uses interdisciplinary, cross-scale methods to answer applied biological research questions. Her research group studies the causes and consequences of ecosystem degradation and species endangerment and pursues research that seeks to understand how we can prioritize restoration and conservation efforts, identify innovative restoration/conservation strategies, and highlight solutions to declining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Her current projects include using meta-analysis to search for patterns in recovery and restoration; quantifying the effects of vertebrate eradications on threatened island-breeding species; quantifying bison reintroduction impacts on restored prairies; and investigating recovery trajectories of New Zealand islands following rodent removal.
Website: www.bios.niu.edu/jones/lab/

 

 

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Kristen Kaczynski

Kristen Kaczynski, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Applied Ecology in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences at California State University, Chico. Her research interests include disturbance effects and restoration methods of plant communities, primarily in riparian and wetland ecosystems. She focuses on research that answers questions to inform resource management decisions. Her research involves both undergraduate and masters environmental science students. She has a BS in Natural Resources from University of Vermont, an MA in Geography from University of Colorado, Boulder, and a PhD in Ecology from Colorado State University.
Website: http://kristenkaczynski.weebly.com

 

 

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Kristen King

Kristen King is the Director of Natural Areas Restoration and Management in the Forestry, Horticulture, and Natural Resources division of NYC Parks. Her team is responsible for improving urban ecosystem health through invasive plant management, debris removal and wetland restoration, native species planting, and trail management. Kristen has been with NYC Parks since 2007, and has also managed street tree planting, published peer-reviewed research on the benefits of the urban forest, and managed contractor forest restoration work prior to obtaining her current title. Kristen received a BS in Biology from the College of Charleston and an MA in Conservation Biology from Columbia University.

 

 

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Márcia C. M. Marques

Márcia C. M. Marques, PhD, is a Professor at the University of Paraná State, Brazil (since 1995), where she is leading a group interested in the restoration and biodiversity conservation of regenerating tropical forests. Her research has produced over 60 peer-reviewed scientific articles and books. She is currently the vice president of the Brazilian Association for Ecology and Conservation (ABECO), and member of directory of Brazilian Restoration Society (SOBRE).
Website: http://labecovegetal.wordpress.com

 

 

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Jill McGrady

Jill McGrady, PhD is a community ecologist with interests in restoration design and ecosystem valuation. She serves as Associate Ecologist at Great Ecology Inc. in their La Jolla, CA office. She received her B.S. degree at Purdue University and her PhD. in Ecology and Evolution at Rutgers University, studying food webs. She has been project manager for restoration evaluation and planning on a number of Natural Resource Damage projects and has current interests in raising corporate awareness about ecological land use strategies for surplus properties. She has most recently worked on the Woodbridge Waterfront Park Restoration project in Fords, NJ.
Website: greatecology.com/

 

 

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David Moreno-Mateos

David Moreno-Mateos is a restoration ecologist at the Basque Center for Climate change–BC3 (Basque Country, Spain) appointed by the Ikerbasque Foundation. He finished his PhD at the Universidad de Alcalá and the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) in 2008. He spent three years at UC Berkeley and two at Stanford University as the Jasper Ridge Restoration Fellow. He studies ecosystem recovery after anthropogenic disturbances with especial emphasis on wetlands and forests. He aims to understand patterns of recovery of complex ecosystem attributes (e.g. stability) emerging from organism interactions. In his research, he uses empirical field-collected data and meta-analyses to understand and accelerate the processes of ecosystem recovery in the context of restoration.
Website: http://www.bc3research.org/en/david_moreno.html

 

 

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Andrew Rayburn

Andrew Rayburn is a Certified Ecologist (Ecological Society of America) with over 15 years of applied ecological experience in grasslands, shrublands, rangelands, forests, and riparian ecosystems. His focus is on planning, implementing and evaluating multi-benefit habitat conservation and restoration projects in working landscapes, in which context he applied theories and methods from community, landscape, and spatial ecology. He is particularly interested in strategies to maintain and increase biodiversity in restored ecosystems, as well as approaches to restoration that account for present and future effects of climate change.

 

 

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Carrie Reinhardt Adams

Carrie Reinhardt Adams, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Plant and Restoration Ecology with the Environmental Horticulture Department at the University of Florida in Gainesville. She studies the transition from invasive plant dominance to native species establishment, and focuses on approaches to scale-up experimental manipulations to become applications in natural resource management at the landscape scale. Cooperation with state and federal land management agencies is integral to her research, teaching, and extension programs. She received her BS (Environmental Resources Management) and her MS (Ecology) from Pennsylvania State University, and her PhD from University of Minnesota in Water Resources Science.
Website: hort.ufl.edu/research/restoration-plant-ecology/

 

 

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David J. Robertson

David J. Robertson, PhD, is the Executive Director of the Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, a land conservancy in suburban Philadelphia, a position he has held since 1989. Under his direction, the Pennypack Trust has developed expertise and leadership in the restoration of eastern deciduous forests and in natural land stewardship. Dr. Robertson earned his doctoral degree at the University of Pittsburgh investigating the effects of clearcut forestry on aquatic ecosystems in western Pennsylvania, and then worked for seven years restoring native ecosystems on land disturbed by phosphate ore surface mining in central Florida. From 1995 until 2004, he served as president of the Northeast Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration.
Website: www.pennypacktrust.org/

 

 

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Ted Shear

Ted Shear conducts research and teaches courses in restoration ecology for the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. Active interests include forest and stream restoration, exotic species management, next-generation genetics for increasing climate change resilience in restored forests, and art and architecture in the restoration of urban ecosystems. He has worked in forests in North and Central America, the highland forests of eastern Africa and far southwestern China, and the North Carolina Museum of Art. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. from North Carolina State University.
Website: http://go.ncsu.edu/restorationecology

 

 

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Greg Spyreas

Greg Spyreas, PhD has worked as a plant ecologist and botanist with the Illinois Natural History Survey for 15 years. Previous to that he had stints with forest preserves, environmental consulting firms, and the Nature Conservancy. His research interests can be described as applied ecology that aims to bring about better conservation, restoration, management, monitoring, and understanding of natural areas and their floras/faunas. Though it has focused on pristine wilderness areas, his research most often looks at the restoration of habitats in human dominated landscapes, especially those of Midwestern North America.
Website: wwx.inhs.illinois.edu/directory/show/spyreas

 

 

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Katharine Suding

Katharine Suding is a Professor of ecology at the University of Colorado in Boulder. Her research is aimed at understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of systems, why some systems change rapidly and others are surprisingly stable, and how this information can help us better meet conservation and restoration goals. She leads the Niwot Ridge LTER program and is a Fellow of the Ecological Society of America. She received her PhD from the University of Michigan and was on the faculty at the University of California Berkeley before moving to Boulder.

 

 

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Alan Unwin

Alan Unwin, PhD, is the current Chair of the Society of Ecological Restoration (SER). Alan has twice served as chair of the organization’s world conferences, 2001 in Niagara Falls, Canada and 2013 in Madison, Wisconsin. The 2001 conference focused on restoration across borders and was largely a binational effort in collaboration with US EPA’s Great Lakes office and the International Joint Commission. The 2013 world conference attracted over 1500 attendees from over 60 countries worldwide. SER continues to be very influential in regards to global restoration policy assisting and implementing restoration policy through its collaboration with international bodies such as the International Union for Conservation and Nature (IUCN), the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. He is Niagara College’s Associate Dean for Environmental and Horticultural Studies.
Website: www.niagaracollege.ca

 

 

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Dennis Whigham

Dennis Whigham is Senior Botanist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Whigham and his collaborators have published more than 225 articles in journals and books and he has co-edited 10 books, including one on terrestrial orchids and a 2009 volume on Tidal Freshwater Wetlands. The ecology of plants has been his primary interest and has led to studies of woodland herbs—including orchids, vines, wetland species, invasive species, and studies of forests in the tropics, temperate, and boreal zones. Whigham’s current focus is on wetlands, including the role of wetlands associated with juvenile salmon habitat in Alaska; the rarest terrestrial orchid in eastern North America; and invasive species.
Website: www.serc.si.edu/labs/plant_ecology/index.aspx

 

 

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Ken Yocom

Ken Yocom, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington. He earned a PhD from the Program in the Built Environment from the University of Washington (2007), with a foundational education in landscape architecture and wildlife ecology. He has worked extensively in the public and private sectors on the design and management of urban ecological restoration projects. He has published extensively on the topic of urban ecological design practices and is co-editor of the recent book NOW Urbanism: The Future City is Here (Routledge, 2015) and co-author of Ecological Design (Bloomsbury, 2010).
Website: larch.be.washington.edu/people/facultystaff/staff/ken-yocom/

 

 

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Kathryn Yurkonis

Kathryn Yurkonis is an Associate Professor of Biology at the University of North Dakota. Her research combines aspects of plant community and restoration ecology. She is broadly interested in how plant communities assemble and change through time and research focuses on addressing this question though a variety of experimental approaches and at varying ecological scales. Thus far, research in her laboratory has focused on studying temporal and spatial vegetation dynamics in deciduous forests and grasslands. Findings from this research have advanced our understanding of grassland dynamics and shed light on how we might improve upon current grassland restoration practices.
Website: http://arts-sciences.und.edu/biology/faculty/kathryn-yurkonis.cfm

 

 

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Luis Zambrano González

Luis Zambrano González, PhD, is a biologist from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). He holds a doctorate degree from the same university He has published 41 scientific articles, 7 book chapters, and 15 articles of science communication. Since 2010, he has been a renowned B Senior Researcher of fulltime at UNAM and he has a level II of the National System of Researchers. Currently, he works as the Executive Secretary of the Ecological Reserve of the Pedregal of San Angel (RESPA, UNAM) and is the chief director of the Ecological Restoration Laboratory at the Biology Institute. Moreover, in 2011 he started the blog“Sustain- able Urban Ecosystems” with more than 70 publications, which covers the ecology that develops within cities.

 

 

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