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Obituary for former The Journal of Human Resources editor

Glen G. Cain

Glen G. Cain served as editor for The Journal of Human Resources from 1968-1985. An excerpt of his obituary is below, or see the full obituary.

 

After graduating from Lake Forest, Glen went to the University of California-Berkeley where he earned a master's degree in industrial relations in 1957. Then it was back to the Midwest where Glen and Ria got married and Glen began working at the Federal Reserve in downtown Chicago. But Glen decided he wanted a bigger challenge. He applied and was accepted to the University of Chicago where he earned his Ph.D. in economics in 1963, studying under Milton Friedman and other notable economists, some of whom became Nobel Prize winners. Upon graduation, Glen was offered a tenure-track position at the University of Wisconsin and moved to Madison with his wife and young son. The family would grow to three children with the addition of two daughters.

 

Glen left an important legacy in his chosen field. His dissertation, published in 1966, was titled Married Women in the Labor Force and described one of the most important trends in the United States economy in the post-World War II period. Glen worked closely with the UW's Institute for Research on Poverty and was a prolific writer, authoring articles, papers and chapters in books on labor economics. Some of his professional and volunteer affiliations included service on the National Commission on Employment and Unemployment Statistics; the advisory panel to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission; the board of directors of the National Bureau of Economic Research; and on Lake Forest College's board of trustees. Glen was also editor of the Journal of Human Resources. Glen retired from the UW in 1995, although he remained active in his research and continued to work closely with the UW graduate students he mentored and cared so much about in the economics program.

 

Preview of SubStance Special Issue

"David Mitchell in the Labyrinth of Time: Review of The Bone Clocks" and Preview of an Interview with the Author

As an online preview of a special issue of SubStance devoted to David Mitchell’s fiction, we are posting a review-essay of his book by Paul Harris and an excerpt of an interview with the author. The interview will appear in the special issue in spring 2015.

 

A Review of David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks by Paul A. Harris, Editor, SubStance

David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks, the latest iteration of his fractal imagination, follows a central character’s life through six decades in six sections that simultaneously succeed as stand-alone stories. Protagonist Holly Sykes narrates the first and final chapters; in the middle ones, her life is seen prismatically through the lenses of others who cross her path: Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, war journalist Ed Brubeck, bad-boy author Crispin Hershey, and Horologist Marinus. Navigating this narrative proves to be a rollicking ride: the plot is a propulsive page-turner, picking up momentum as it goes; the narrative is kaleidoscopic-episodic, unfolding in a series of juxtapositions and sometimes sudden shifts; the style is protean, skipping skillfully among different rhetorical registers, allusive layers, and literary genres.


Click here for full review and interview excerpt.

 

Ecological Restoration gets a new look

Ecological Restoration

If you haven't seen it yet, take a look at the new cover for Ecological Restoration. We're excited by the opportunity to showcase beautiful, big photos on the cover. Like the one at the left, featuring Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada.

Full caption:
The application of demographic characteristics to select introduced populations for eradication is a simple yet meaningful step in restoration. Queenie Gray and colleagues ranked high-elevation lakes in Waterton Lakes National Park, Canada, for trout eradication using trout demographic characteristics that may render these populations more susceptible to depletion and ultimately extinction. This research provides insight into the characteristics of introduced salmonid populations and facilitates restoration by offering a science-based system of prioritizing impacted mountain lake ecosystems. Photo Credit: Ryan Peruniak.

 

See the TOC here, or read the editorial “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors?” (free to all).

 

 


 

About the UW Press Journals Division

The Journals Division serves a world-wide community of scholars, researchers, and practitioners through the publication of peer-reviewed academic and professional journals in print and electronic form. Our staff of specialists in production, marketing, customer service, advertising sales, and finance bring added value to every issue published. Our non-commercial approach helps contain costs, and keeps resources within the academy.

 

If you are looking for a publisher for your journal please click on the “Proposals” link for information about submitting your title for consideration.

 

The Press endeavors to extend the influence of the University and the academic community beyond the library, laboratory, and classroom. Through the scholarly publishing functions of the Press, we are dedicated to the principle that education and research should influence people's lives throughout the world.

 

 

News

12/2014

Ecological Restoration’s cited in Nature World News article

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11/2014

Obituary for former The Journal of Human Resources editor

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3/2014

Ecological Restoration’s Managing Editor interviewed by BBC

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3/2014

The Journal of Human Resources Retirement Article Attracts Interest

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3/2014

Ecological Restoration gets a new look

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2/2014

Landscape Journalís editorial office moves to University of GA

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1/2014

The Journal of Human Resources article “Can Intensive Early Childhood Intervention Programs Eliminate Income-Based Cognitive and Achievement Gaps?” cited by MinnPost.com

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1/2014

The Journal of Human Resources article “Using Incentives to Encourage Healthy Eating in Children” cited by ThePacker.com

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11/2013

The Journal of Human Resources article cited pre-publication by NPR.

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10/2013

SubStance Special Issue Impact Boom! The Commodification of the University was reviewed in Russian journal Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie (New Literary Observer)

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10/2013

The final Ecological Restoration (with the old cover design).

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9/2013

The JHR Article "Lucky in Life, Unlucky in Love? The Effect of Random Income Shocks on Marriage and Divorce" cited in The Hudson Valley Press Online

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5/2013

The JHR Article "The Risk of Divorce and Household Saving Behavior?" cited pre-publication in The New York Times blog post "Risk of Divorce Leads People to Save More"

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3/2013

The JHR Article "Discrimination Begins in the Womb: Evidence of Sex-Selective Prenatal Investments" cited in multiple news stories

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