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The Invisible Jewish Budapest
Metropolitan Culture at the Fin de Siècle

The George L. Mosse Series in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History
Steven E. Aschheim, Stanley G. Payne, Mary Louise Roberts, and David J. Sorkin, Series Editors

A groundbreaking history of modernist Budapest

Budapest at the fin de siècle was famed and emulated for its cosmopolitan urban culture and nightlife. It was also the second-largest Jewish city in Europe. Mary Gluck delves into the popular culture of Budapest’s coffee houses, music halls, and humor magazines to uncover the enormous influence of assimilated Jews in creating modernist Budapest between 1867 and 1914. She explores the paradox of Budapest in this era: because much of the Jewish population embraced and promoted a secular, metropolitan culture, their influence as Jews was both profound and invisible.

 

Author. Photo credit, Name Mary Gluck is a professor of history and Judaic studies at Brown University. She is the author of Georg Lukács and His Generation, 1900–1918 and Popular Bohemia: Modernism and Urban Culture in Nineteenth-Century Paris.

 

 


 

Praise

“A magnificently consequential book. Gluck examines the vibrant modernist culture created largely by secular Jews in Budapest, in counterpoint to a backward-looking, nationalistic Hungarian establishment and a conservative Jewish religious elite”
—Scott Spector, author of Violent Sensations: Sex, Crime, and Utopia in Vienna and Berlin, 1860–1914

“Gluck’s argument is so brilliant, perceptive, and clear that one can forget what a radical challenge it is to received opinion.”
—Steven Beller, author of Rethinking Vienna 1900

“Mary Gluck’s retrieval, indeed her illumination of this lost cultural world is so powerful exactly because it leaves room for its darker side. She has descended into the underbelly of the golden age of Hungarian Jewry and emerged with a diamond.”
Hungarian Historical Review

 

 

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The Invisible Jewish Budapest
Larger images

April 2016
LC: 2015036814 DS
272 pp. 6 x 9
40 b/w illus.

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Cloth $39.95 t
ISBN 978-0-299-30770-7
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