Category Archives: Journals

Toni Gunnison named Journals Division Manager at University of Wisconsin Press

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Toni Gunnison (photo by Chloe Lauer)

Toni Gunnison
(photo by Chloe Lauer)

After a national search, Toni Gunnison has been appointed manager of the Journals Division at the University of Wisconsin Press. Gunnison first joined UWP as journals marketing manager in 2007. Since March 2015 she has served as interim journals manager, following the departure of Jason Gray, who left to join the staff of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs.

The University of Wisconsin Press currently publishes fifteen journals covering a broad range of humanities, social science, and STEM areas. Titles include American Orthoptic Journal, Arctic Anthropology, Contemporary Literature, Ecological Restoration, the Journal of Human Resources, Land Economics, Landscape Journal, Luso-Brazilian Review, Monatshefte, Native Plants Journal, and Substance. The newest journals, put under contract during Gunnison’s tenure as interim journals manager, are Constitutional Studies, African Economic History, Ghana Studies, and Mande Studies.

“Toni is a strong leader whose skills, experiences, and vision for the future will greatly benefit the University of Wisconsin Press,” says Dennis Lloyd, director of UWP. “I am looking forward to working with her. Her knowledge of what the Journals Division has been—and what it can be—is unparalleled.”

Over the past eight years, Gunnison has handled diverse assignments for UWP, including journal and books marketing, project management for website and database renovations, and serving as liaison to content-hosting platforms such as HighWire, JSTOR, and Project MUSE.

As chair of the Digital Committee of the Association of American University Presses for the last two years, Gunnison is well versed in issues facing academic publishers as digital content continues to evolve.

“Our journals are in a strong position to face the changes in academic publishing. We’re eager to use our expertise as publishers to help journal editors and their staffs adapt to new ways of working, as well as making journal content more accessible and visible,” Gunnison noted.

At the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Gunnison has served on several search committees and on the Equity and Diversity Committee of the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Research and Graduate Education.

David Mitchell in the Labyrinth of Time: Review of THE BONE CLOCKS and Preview of an Interview with the Author

As an online preview of a special issue of SubStance devoted to David Mitchell’s fiction, we are posting a review-essay of his book by Paul Harris and an excerpt of an interview with the author. The interview will appear in the special issue in spring 2015.


 

The Bone Clocks coverA Review of David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks
by Paul A. Harris, Editor, SubStance

David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks, the latest iteration of his fractal imagination, follows a central character’s life through six decades in six sections that simultaneously succeed as stand-alone stories. Protagonist Holly Sykes narrates the first and final chapters; in the middle ones, her life is seen prismatically through the lenses of others who cross her path: Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, war journalist Ed Brubeck, bad-boy author Crispin Hershey, and Horologist Marinus. Navigating this narrative proves to be a rollicking ride: the plot is a propulsive page-turner, picking up momentum as it goes; the narrative is kaleidoscopic-episodic, unfolding in a series of juxtapositions and sometimes sudden shifts; the style is protean, skipping skillfully among different rhetorical registers, allusive layers, and literary genres.

At the same time, The Bone Clocks is a tightly woven text that recursively loops through Mitchell’s previous books and ultimately interlaces all his books into an intricate, sprawling intertext. Returning Mitchell readers will encounter familiar faces (Lamb, Marinus), and recognize allusions to his other books (“The Voorman Problem,” a story attributed to Hershey, is from Number9Dream; the “symmetrical structure” of Hershey’s novel Dessicated Embryos can be read as an allusion to Cloud Atlas, and there’s even a comical reference to the movie). Back-stories in The Bone Clocks turn into/out of back-stories to episodes/elements from previous novels (Magistrate Shiroyama’s killing Abbot Enomoto in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet; the Prescients in Cloud Atlas).

More broadly, the form of The Bone Clocks is a synthesis of globe-trotting Ghostwritten and time-traveling Cloud Atlas. In tone and style, Holly Sykes’s rebellious teen sojourn into the countryside is straight out of contemporaneously-set Black Swan Green (she’s a slightly older avatar of Jason Taylor). While each chapter of that novel covered a calendar month over a year, each section of The Bone Clocks is set in a specific decade, beginning thirty years ago and ending thirty years into the future. Eventually, one surmises that the heterogeneous characters and events in The Bone Clocks, and its central plot conflicts, are all always already written into something called “The Script,” a self-reflexive motif for the text itself, and perhaps for Mitchell’s body of work as well. Continue reading

Native Plants & Fire

“Fire. Man’s oldest foe. Insatiable, remorseless, unquenchable.” – Kent Brockman.

Reporter for Springfield’s Channel 6 news (on The Simpsons), Kent Brockman isn’t quite right about fire, though I’m sure it seems like it when the flames are threatening your house. I’ve been watching the coverage of the fires in San Diego County. I grew up in Oceanside, a city currently surrounded by the brush fires in Carlsbad, San Marcos, Escondido, and Camp Pendleton. The house where I once lived is in no immediate danger, and neither are the few family friends still living on that street, but many others in the area are not so lucky.

Fire is a necessity to certain ecosystems, including Southern California. The chapparal that commonly grows there is easily burned and the smoke assists germination. And up north, the giant sequoia needs fire to clear the understory and heat for its pinecones to open and disperse seeds.

NBC7 in San Diego posted a list of fire resistant plants, including a subset of native plants. Ideally, those would be the only ones people would use, since using non-native plants introduces other potential problems. All in all, it seems like a smart strategy to me to use these native plants as a line of defense against fires that will certainly come.

For more about how fire and smoke affect the germination of seeds, see the following articles in Native Plants Journal:

Thomas D Landis. “Where there’s smoke… There’s Germination?” (1.1)

Michele J Laskowski, Chelsea C Dicksion, Brianna Schaefer, and Betty Young. “Examining smoke water as a potential germination-enhancing technique to aid the recovery of the endangered Franciscan manzanita (Arctostaphylos franciscana Eastw. [Ericaceae])” (14.1)

To paraphrase Ron Burgundy, Stay safe, San Diego.

-Jason Gray, Journals Manager