Category Archives: Uncategorized

University Press Week 2018 Friday Blog Tour: #TurnItUP Science

Continue the blog tour today by visiting these great university press offerings:

  • Princeton University Press director Christie Henry writes about the evolution of science publishing at university presses, focusing on how these programs depend on creating equitable and inclusive populations of authors.
  • Columbia University Press acquisitions editor Miranda Martin discusses why it’s importand for university presses to publish in the sciences.
  • Rutgers University Press talks about Finding Einstein’s Brain by Frederick Lepore, MD.
  • University of Colorado Press shares a post from author Char Miller about how imagination requires hope: at once a mode of survival and a form of resistance.
  • Toronto University Press reaches back to the archives of The Heritage Project to highlight some key titles on the history of science.
  • University of Georgia Press posts the latest episode of their podcast: a talk William Bryan gave recently at the Decatur Book Festival for his book The Price of Permanence: Nature and Business in the New South.

Hope you enjoy all these great #TurnItUP posts!

University Press Week 2018 Thursday Blog Tour: #TurnItUP History

Continue the blog tour today by visiting these great university press offerings:

  • University Press of Kansas celebrates the passion of military history readers by interviewing authors, critics and customers.
  • University of Nebraska Press discusses the importance of Midwestern history with Jon K. Lauck.
  • University of Georgia Press spotlights their new series, Gender and Slavery.
  • University of Rochester Press interviews Angel David Nieves about the role of African American women in the design and construction of schools in the post-Reconstruction South.
  • Rutgers University Press focuses on their recently published memoir by acclaimed cultural historian H. Bruce Franklin, Crash Course: From the Good War to the Forever War.
  • University of California Press shares an excerpt from Shaped by the West, Volume 2: A History of North America from 1850 by William Deverell & Anne F. Hyde.
  • Wilfred Laurier University Press explores how the Great War impacted Wittgenstein’s philosophy with author Nil Santiáñez.
  • Beacon Press takes a look at their ReVisioning Amerian History and ReVisioning American History for Young Readers Series.
  • Harvard University Press executive editor Lindsay Waters looks back on the press’s history of publishing philosopher Bruno Latour.
  • University of Alabama Press presents roundup of new and forthcoming history books celebrating Alabama’s bicentennial.
  • MIT Press has a Q&A with longtime editor Roger Conover about his history at the MIT Press.

Hope you enjoy all these great #TurnItUP posts!

University Press Week 2018 Wednesday Blog Tour: #TurnItUP the Neighborhood

Continue the blog tour today by visiting these great university press offerings:

  • University of Illinois Press announces their new regional trade imprint, Flame & Flight Books, which will tell the unknown stories of the heartland’s unique places, people, and culture.
  • Syracuse University Press writes about their encyclopedic grasp on the region they hold dear.
  • Northwestern University interviews Harvey Young, founding series editor, about the “Second to None” Chicago regional series.
  • Columbia University Press features excerpts from some of their newest and most poplular publications about New York and its neighborhoods.
  • Rutgers University Press discusses Walking Harlem by Karen Taborn, recently featured in a New York Times roundup of walking tour books.
  • University of Washington Press shares some highlights from an interview by prison scholar Dan Berger with John McCoy, co-author of Concrete Mama: Prison Profiles from Walla Walla, soon to be released in its second edition.
  • University of Toronto Press writes about connections to their neighborhoods.
  • Ohio State Press takes a behind-the-scenes look at Time and Change, a forthcoming book celebrating the University’s 150th year.
  • University Press of Mississippi posts a Q&A with Catherine Egley Waggoner and Laura Egley Taylor, authors of Realizing Our Place: Real Southern Women in a Mythologized Land.
  • Oregon State University Press talks to journalist John Dodge about the Columbus Day Storm of 1962 and his forthcoming title, A Deadly Wind.
  • University of Manitoba Press talks to GIS specialist and author Adrian Werner about how he used mapping to make a Metis community in Winnipeg visible.
  • Following Temple University Founder Russell Conwell’s ideas of Acres of Diamonds, Temple University Press mines riches in its backyard.
  • Fordham University Press discusses the changing neighborhood of Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant with Ron Howell.
  • University of Alberta Press author Carissa Halton explores what is it like to move into a neighborhood that was given a zero quality of life rating.
  • University of Georgia Press hosts a Q&A with Sandra Beasley, editor of a poetry collection that touches upon uniquely southern connections to food.
  • University of Texas Press presents an interview with Lance Scott Walker about his oral history of Houston Rap.

Hope you enjoy all these great #TurnItUP posts!

New Books, April 2018

We’re pleased to announce the following books to be published this month.

April 10, 2018
Daughter in Retrograde: A Memoir

Courtney Kersten

“Set against the backdrop of casserole-heavy Wisconsin, Kersten’s memoir is pithy and hopeful; she writes with great wonder about human existence and the mysteries of life after death.”— Booklist

“Finds miracles in the mundane and illuminates the deeper truths of love. . . .
A finely written memoir that captures the sass and splendor of
two unforgettable women.”— Foreword Reviews

“Alternately comic and poignant, Kersten’s book is a coming of-age story about faith and a searching meditation on the mother-daughter bond. . . . A refreshingly quirky memoir of soul-searching and family.”— Kirkus Reviews

 

April 17, 2018
J. D. Salinger and the Nazis

Eberhard Alsen

“[A] concise narrative that enlightens a part of a dark and mysterious literary figure of our time.”New York Journal of Books

“A convincing documentary narrative providing an important record of Salinger’s life during the war. Alsen presents a great deal of compelling new evidence that needs to be available for readers and scholars.”—John Wenke, author of J.D. Salinger: A Study of the Short Fiction

“A question driving Alsen’s research and analysis of Salinger’s early stories is, What did Jerry Salinger think, feel, and write about Nazis?”—Sarah Elbert, editor of The American Prejudice against Color

 

April 17, 2018
Among the Aspen: Northwoods Grouse and Woodcock Hunting

Mark Parman

“Parman takes us along on these hunts, talking about the geography, geology, vegetation, hunting conditions, dogs dealing with the surroundings, and things that must go through a hunter’s and his dog’s minds when they are away from civilization.”Outdoor News

“Most hunters are lovers of nature—its smells, sights, sounds, and the feelings that wilderness evokes. Parman, in these well-crafted stories and thoughtful essays, teaches us that there is much more to hunting than shooting.”—Jerry Apps

“The best outdoors writers are always good storytellers, and Parman follows in that tradition. Reading his words, we’re smelling the sweet ferns, hearing the faint clank of a dog’s bell, seeing the sudden flush of birds.”—Jerry Davis

 

April 24, 2018
The Oresteia: Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and The Holy Goddesses

Aeschylus
A verse translation by David Mulroy, with introduction and notes

Wisconsin Studies in Classics

First presented in the spring of 458 B.C.E. at the festival of Dionysus in Athens, Aeschylus’ trilogy Oresteia won the first prize. Comprising three plays—AgamemnonLibation Bearers, and The Furies—it is the only surviving example of the ancient trilogy form for Greek tragedies.

“Mulroy’s rendering could well become the standard text for students of classics in English, as pre-reading for those attempting the difficult Greek, and possibly as an acting version. . . . It is the best this reviewer has come across.”Classics for All

 

New Books & New Paperbacks, March 2018

We’re pleased to announce the books that we’re publishing this month.

March 6, 2018
The Golden Coin
Alan Feldman

Wisconsin Poetry Series

“A poet whose emotional resources are immense. From book to book, Alan Feldman continues to widen and deepen his poetic reach until even the stars are drawn down to his writing table.”—Bill Zavatsky, author of Where X Marks the Spot

Any humanist’s hero, Alan Feldman writes poems that distill from honest observation and a generous, discerning heart. The only thing that mitigates the regret of leaving the self-deprecating confidence and expansive vision of these poems is the instructive memory of their sensibility.”—Jessica Greenbaum, author of The Two Yvonnes

 

March 6, 2018
The Explosive Expert’s Wife

Shara Lessley

Wisconsin Poetry Series

“Lessley guides us along the knife-edge of a country on the edge of wars. An ex-pat Penelope wondering about her own Odysseus singed in ash, she keenly and empathically witnesses not only her own vulnerability as a young American mother in Amman but also courageous women around herfrom Jordan’s all-female demining team to an accused terrorist’s wife.”
—Philip Metres

“Lessley’s poetry tunes our eyes and ears to recognize that each of us not only holds within ourselves the capacity to inflict terror upon one another, but the capability to endure it as well. This work exhorts us to become numb to neither.”—Consequence

 

March 6, 2018
Now in Paperback
The Black Penguin

Andrew Evans

Living Out: Gay and Lesbian Autobiographies

“As travel literature, the fascination of The Black Penguin lies in the difficulties Evans has undertaken by choosing to travel only by bus all the way 12,000 miles through the Southern USA, Central America and South America.”Traveler’s Library

“Evans interweaves three urgent personal quests: his expedition, his effort to convince his family to accept his homosexuality and his struggle for the right to marry the man he loved. . . . The Black Penguin relays the ups and downs of that journey, but the terra incognita [he] claims is his own pride.”New York Times Book Review

“Combines an improbable trek to Antarctica with . . . struggles surrounding religion, family, and sexuality. . . . Excellent writing and eye for detail.”Publishers Weekly

 

March 13, 2018
What Drowns the Flowers in Your Mouth: A Memoir of Brotherhood
Rigoberto González

  • “In this compelling, eloquent recollection of his relationship with his younger sibling, Alex, González offers a sincere portrait of the joys and difficulties of brotherhood.”—Booklist
  • “Generous, and intimate, González’s memoir offers a riveting account of the bond that saved two brothers from their tortured past while offering lucid glimpses into the meaning of Latino manhood. A raw, emotionally intense memoir.”—Kirkus Reviews

“With gut-wrenching, skin-close honesty, Rigoberto González—already decorated for the stunning achievements of his two previous memoirs—offers a riveting account of the sustaining love between brothers in the midst of raw grief, trauma, and wrenching poverty. The stakes couldn’t be higher or the writing more intense. A literary victory.”—Joy Castro, author of Island of Bones

 

March 20, 2018
Given Up for You: A Memoir of Love, Belonging, and Belief
Erin O. White

Living Out: Gay and Lesbian Autobiographies

“Reckoning with the rival claims of queer desire and Catholic faith, Erin O. White has written that rare and wonderful thing: an intimately personal page-turner that raises complex questions about the wider world and our future in it.”
—Leni Zumas, author of Red Clocks

“White’s excellent, often heartbreaking memoir is about how faith and desire intersect—and when an impassible distance remains between them.”—Lit Hub

Given Up for You is a wonder—as poetic, spare, and declarative as the gospels themselves.”—Foreword Reviews

 

March 27, 2018
Home of the Braves: The Battle for Baseball in Milwaukee
Patrick W. Steele

“How could such a profound love affair between a city and its baseball team turn so toxic? Home of the Braves grapples with that issue, and its conclusions may surprise you. They surprised me.”—from the foreword by Bob Buege, author of The Milwaukee Braves: A Baseball Eulogy

“The truth behind one of the darkest divorces in sports history, revealing details often lost in the shadows of nostalgia. Steele’s extensive research uncovers a war of greed, jealousy, and contempt between the Braves and Milwaukee’s civic leaders.”—William Povletich, author of Milwaukee Braves: Heroes and Heartbreak

UW Press book inspires national framework for teaching about slavery

A framework for teaching middle school and high school students about slavery, developed by the Southern Poverty Law Center and launched Feb. 1, was inspired by and based on a book published by the University of Wisconsin Press in 2016.

new report from the SPLC found a broad failure of textbooks, state standards and pedagogy to adequately address the role slavery played in the development of the United States — or how its legacies still influence us today.

Photo: Cover of "Teaching American Slavery" book

The framework, called Teaching Hard History: American Slavery, was developed by the SPLC and its Teaching Tolerance project based on UW Press’s Understanding and Teaching American Slaveryedited by Bethany Jay and Cynthia Lynn Lyerly. The book is aimed primarily at history teachers at the college and advanced secondary levels, but it lays out 10 key concepts essential to teaching the topic at any level. The 10 concepts became the basis for the entire Teaching Hard History curriculum.

UW Press published the book as part of its Harvey Goldberg Series for Understanding and Teaching History, which aims to provide a deeper understanding of complex areas of history and tools to teach about them creatively and effectively. The series is named for Harvey Goldberg, a professor renowned for his history teaching at Oberlin College, Ohio State University and the University of Wisconsin from the 1960s to the 1980s. Goldberg is remembered for his commitment to helping students think critically about the past with the goal of creating a better future.

Other books published in the series to date focus on the Vietnam War; U.S. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History; the Cold War; and the Age of Revolutions. Future topics will include volumes on teaching about the Holocaust, the civil rights movement, the modern Middle East, and Native American history.

UW Press is administratively located within UW–Madison’s Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education.

Autobiographical Confession in Pop Culture

Megan Brown is the author of American Autobiography after 9/11, published this week. She reflects in this post on contemporary examples of the performative aspect of confession and how we have come to expect that as an audience. Brown is an associate professor of English at Drake University, and her new book is published in the University of Wisconsin Press series, Wisconsin Studies in Autobiography

I need to confess something here: I am an avid fan of the kinds of pop culture that many in my field readily disparage. Yes, I’ll crank up the car radio volume if “Bad Blood” comes on, and yes, I like to cackle about episodes of the various Bachelor franchises with my friends, and yes, I’ll probably keep doing these things even as Taylor Swift songs and reality television shows become more predictable and repetitive over the years. Indeed, the predictability and the repetition are the very things that I find not only appealing, but also fascinating. Some viewers and listeners might find the familiar tropes—insisting on being at the week’s rose ceremony for the “right reasons” or dissing unfaithful men in uptempo C major—comforting in an uncertain world, but I find them strange. They are shorthand, performative gestures toward confession that blur the boundaries between fiction and nonfiction by manipulating and satisfying audience expectations. As Michel Foucault reminds us, audience is central to the workings of confession—as he writes in The History of Sexuality, “one does not confess without the presence (or virtual presence) of a partner who is not simply the interlocutor but the authority who requires the confession.” The confessor is expected and compelled to follow tropes of confessional narrative, and listeners will respond—often with credulity—according to the confessor’s level of fidelity to that narrative.

Let me explain further by turning first to Taylor Swift’s 1989, featuring the singles “Style,” “Shake It Off,” “Blank Space,” and the aforementioned “Bad Blood.” As these songs and their videos became popular, writers in music magazines and on social media alike focused on one factor above all: the lyrics. Billboard dished on 1989’s references to Swift’s ex, Harry Styles of One Direction fame. The Washington Post offered an extended analysis of “Bad Blood,” using quotations and screenshots of fans’ Facebook posts and tweets to suggest that the song was intended as a takedown of Swift’s fellow pop diva, Katy Perry. Questions swirled as listeners tried to map the singles’ lyrics onto the singer’s life. This phenomenon is by no means limited to Swift—consider, for instance, the summer 2016 arguments about the “real” identity of Beyonce’s “Becky with the Good Hair.” Why, though, would anyone assume that song lyrics are autobiographical? Why would we assume that “Becky” is a real, identifiable person, and that Beyonce’s Lemonade is her account of struggles in her marriage to Jay Z? Can’t a popular performer sing from the point of view of a fictional persona, or write songs about fictional characters? In interviews, Swift coyly drops hints about life events that inspired her songs, but—more importantly, in my view—listeners assume autobiographical narrative in her lyrics because she performs “what confession sounds like” in contemporary memoir. Her songs come from a first-person perspective, and they signal authentic vulnerability by presenting a flawed narrator (the girl who “goes on too many dates but can’t make them stay,” as “Shake It Off” proclaims) with less-than-pretty emotions.

Getty Images

Getty Images

Think, too, about the confessional imperative—the idea that Swift “keeps it real” is central to her appeal. Firmly ensconced in celebrity culture, she is always expected to write about her love life, to keep the conversation and speculation going, even if the songs become formulaic. While her audience is not “requiring” the confessions in the way envisioned by Foucault, her continued relevance may well depend on meeting listener/viewer expectations for autobiographical narrative. Her songs, and the items about her in gossip columns, feed each other in a symbiotic relationship that may assure her career longevity. (Or, at least, assure her ongoing notoriety—it’s interesting that her controversial 2016 dispute with Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West is again about “autobiographical” lyrics, this time in West’s “Famous.”)

If we turn to the example of reality TV, we can see how the performed confessional—again, the outward signs of authentic vulnerability—becomes crucial to contestants’ longevity or popularity on a show. Summer 2016 brought the twelfth installment of The Bachelorette, and the most recent Bachelor in early 2016 was the twentieth season of that series. In both of these iterations of

ABC.com

ABC.com

the reality franchise, the contestants receiving the most screen time spent much of that time confessing their feelings and telling stories about their pasts. Maybe these contestants were coached by show producers or by viewings of past seasons, but they seemed to know how to perform; one front-runner, Robby Hayes, was the first to tell the titular Bachelorette, JoJo Fletcher, that he loved her, and he led up to his confession of love by telling a dramatic part of his life story: “I came here [to be on The Bachelorette] because of huge changes I made in my life. Last year, on April 17, my best friend from growing up died. . . . It made me realize that if I’m not happy in the job I’m in, I’m not happy in the city I’m in, and if I’m constantly questioning the relationship I’m in, tomorrow might not be here.” This revelation, while potentially heartfelt, also worked as a strategy for Robby—JoJo later tells the cameras that Robby’s confessed feelings and experiences influenced her to keep him on the show and helped her trust him even when tabloids claimed he might have broken up with his previous girlfriend just so that he could appear on TV. The eventual winner of the season, Jordan Rodgers, similarly deployed autobiographical detail to win JoJo’s trust in the wake of controversial tabloid revelations. JoJo, and her viewing audience choosing to watch and commenting online, expected confessions and rewarded adherence to the well-worn tropes of autobiographical, confessional narrative.

Given the pop music and reality TV references in this post, a reader might be tempted to dismiss the observations here as trivial or irrelevant, but the performance of autobiographical conventions also affects, and can even shape, our politics. Just after summer 2016’s Democratic National Convention, Hillary Clinton enjoyed a “bounce” in her polling numbers, not just in terms of responses to her policy ideas, but also in terms of potential voters’ opinions on aspects of her character, such as being “in touch with the problems of normal Americans” and being “a president you could be proud of.” One reason for the post-Convention bounce? Former president Bill Clinton’s speech, which—as sources ranging from the New York Times to the Conservative Review commented—focused almost exclusively on “humanizing” the candidate via autobiographical stories about the Clintons’ relationship and family life. (This humanizing strategy was highly gendered, creating a portrait of self-proclaimed policy wonk Hillary Clinton as an emotional, even sexual, entity—a topic for another post.) Like Taylor Swift, Beyonce, Kanye West, and The Bachelorette’s many contestants over the years, Bill Clinton knew and used the power of the performative conventions of autobiographical narrative.

University Press Week 2016! #FollowFriday blog tour

upweek2016_LogoSmallThe University Press Week blog tour concludes today, with the theme of #Follow Friday.

 

 

 

 University of California Press offers links to blogs and social channels, showing how they foster community through their publishing and dynamic outreach efforts.

 Seminary Co-op Bookstores provides links to all UP authors that spoke at the Seminary Co-op in November.

University of Nebraska Press congratulates recent literary contest winners.

University of Minnesota Press writes about an upcoming symposium titled Avant Museology.

University of North Carolina Press shares a #FollowFriday post connecting readers to many of their publishing partners.

MIT Press writes about the MIT Press bookstore’s move to a new location.

 

We invite you to follow news from the University of Wisconsin Press on these sites. Click through to find our home pages.

Twitter   “Follow” us here.

Facebook  “Like” us here.

Blog    Subscribe to the blog in the righthand sidebar.

Thanks for participating in University Press Week 2016!

 

University Press Week 2016! Monday Blog Tour: The People in Our Neighborhood

One of the highlights of University Press Week is the blog tour, in which presses and bookstores celebrate the work of university presses with fascinating and diverse posts, with a different theme each day. Today’s theme is “The People in Our Neighborhood.” Begin today at Northwestern University Press. Rutgers University celebrated their 250th anniversary, and Rutgers University Press played a large role in the festivities—replete with fun photos. Check out Fordham University Press for another interesting post. The University of Toronto Press publishing blog features their history editor, who recounts her experiences running lectures at a nearby Jewish Community Centre in Toronto on Why History Matters Today, which showcases a string of their higher education authors. Their sister blog, University of Toronto Press Journals, spotlights one of their journal editors and the work they are doing in their own communities related to the journal. Seminary Co-op Bookstores shares a curated book list of favorite University Press titles from Haun Saussy, faculty member at the University of Chicago faculty and an author with both Columbia University Press and Fordham University Press. Athabasca University Press features members of their editorial committee. Be sure to return here tomorrow to continue the tour!

Remembering Jean Sue Libkind

Jean Sue Johnson Libkind. Photo by Robert Libkind.

Jean Sue Johnson Libkind. Photo by Robert Libkind.

In Memoriam, Jean Sue Johnson Libkind, former marketing manager of the University of Wisconsin Press

JEAN SUE JOHNSON LIBKIND, retired publishing executive and literary agent, died Oct. 17, 2015 at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse, Philadelphia. Mrs. Libkind, 71, had resided in Philadelphia since 1984.

Mrs. Libkind, born in Racine, Wisconsin, operated a literary agency in Philadelphia, the Bookschlepper, representing university and academic publishers in the management of subsidiary rights. After graduation from Park High School in Racine, she earned a bachelor of arts degree in journalism in 1966 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She attended the university on a scholarship from Western Printing of Racine, the publishers of Golden Books, where her father was a staff artist. She also attended summer school at the University of Oslo, Norway. While at the University of Wisconsin, she was managing editor of the student newspaper, the Daily Cardinal. She also served as a board member of the Daily Cardinal Alumni Association.

Before starting her own agency, she was director of publishing operations for the Jewish Publication Society in Philadelphia, and before that worked as a marketing manager for the University of Pennsylvania Press, the University of Georgia Press, and the University of Wisconsin Press. She had also served as managing director of Worldwide Books in Ithaca, New York. Her professional affiliations included Women in Scholarly Publishing, of which she was a founding member, the Philadelphia Publishers Group, Women in Communications, and the Madison Press Club.

She was among the founders and later president of Friends of Eastern State Penitentiary Park, which improved the neglected property outside the walls of the historic prison in Philadelphia’s Fairmount neighborhood. While a resident of Madison, Wisconsin, she was president of seven after school day care centers. She was a member of the Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship of Athens, Georgia, and was until her recent illness active with the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, including its women’s book club.

She was preceded in death by her son, Eric David Spradling; her father, John B. Johnson; her mother, Jean Barr Johnson; and step-mother, Loretta Richards Johnson. She is survived by her husband, Robert L. Libkind, as well as aunts and cousins in Wisconsin, Alaska and Norway.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the American Heart Association.

Jean Sue has asked that the following be sent to all her friends in the event of her death:

My apologia,

Like a bird on a wire, like a drunk in a midnight choir, I have tried in my way to be free. 

If I, if I’ve been unkind, I hope that you will just let it go by, and if I, if I have been untrue, I hope you know that it was not to you. 

I saw a man, a beggar leaning on his crutch. He said to me, “Why do you ask for so much?” There was a woman, a woman leaning in a door, She said “Why not, why not, why not ask for more?’

Like a bird on a wire, like a drunk in a midnight choir, I have tried in my way to be free.

— Leonard Cohen.

Here are some things you’ve heard me say; I call them “GienTsu-isms”—

  • It is not enough to survive. One must do it with a sense of style, a sense of grace and a sense of humor.
  • The mark of a civilization is how it treats its old, its young and its ill. We are barbarians.
  • “If you give a child a love of reading and teach him to read with ease, the child can learn anything.”
  • Romance doesn’t end in a marriage; the love evolves into something far deeper than mere romance with a bit of whimsy emerging every once in a while, just for fun.
  • It is not enough to practice what you preach; you must have the courage to preach what you practice.
  • It’s that damn “Y” chromosome: the leg of the Y gets caught in a man’s ear and he can’t hear what you’re saying.
  • There are twenty people in the world and everything else is done with smoke and mirrors.
  • The good news about the human race is that 99.9% of the people are doing the best they can; the bad news is that 99.9% of the people are doing the best they can.
  • A bird in the hand leaves a messy palm.
  • I earned every one of these wrinkles and gray white hairs.
  • I’m an old woman and I can do what I want.
  • The opinions of those who wish you well matter; the others can go to hell.
  • It is easier to ask for forgiveness than beg for permission.
  • Every time I see the light at the end of the tunnel, it’s some damn gnome with a lantern.
  • She’s got Bette Davis eyes; I’ve got Madelyn Albright’s hair.
  • Most policies are like fire hydrants. Everybody wants to leave his/her mark.
  • Subset: There is always a Chihuahua who thinks he is a Great Dane..
  • In case of an emergency, call an ambulance.
  • When the organic material impacts with the ventilating device, have a beer and remember the good times.

With love and affection—Jean Sue

  • Remember: No place is safe: Mrs. Elizabeth Anne Hewelett Hodges, 32, was asleep on the living room couch when a nine-pound meteor came through the roof of her Sulacauga, Alabama house, bounced off the radio and struck her hip (November 30, 1954). She was bruised; the radio did not survive.