Native American Studies


 

Yaqui Resistance and Survival
The Struggle for Land and Autonomy, 1821–1920
Evelyn Hu-DeHart


"An exemplary narrative political history of Yaqui-Mexican relations. It is a milestone in Mexican historiography, for we cannot fully understand the unique nature of the North and its place in Mexican history without a full explanation of relations with the major indigenous peoples of the region."—Mark Wasserman, Americas

Among Mexico's indigenous populations, the Yaqui Indians of Sonora have most successfully repelled threats to their identity, land, and community. Interested in explaining how the relatively "small" nation withstood four centuries of contact with white culture, Evelyn Hu-DeHirt focuses here on the Indians' response to shifting environmental pressures in the period 1820 to 1910—an increasingly violent, and ultimately decisive, chapter in their lives.

Evelyn Hu-DeHart is Associate Professor of History at Washington University. She has contributed studies of Mexican history to a variety of scholarly journals and is the author of Missionaries, Miners, and Indians: History of Spanish Contact with the Yacqui Indians of Northwestern New Spain, 15331820.

the cover of Yaqui Resistance and Survival is dark maroon, with orange lettering, and a jagged white line running across horizontally..

June 1984  

LC: 83-040265 F
312 pp. 6 x 9 
12 illus., 2 maps
ISBN-13: 978-0-299-09660-1
Cloth

The cloth edition of this title is now out of print.

 




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